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tv   Morning Joe  MSNBC  May 9, 2011 6:00am-9:00am EDT

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we have the original tape of him watching tv, he has the white beard, then he watches the keith hernandez, clyde frazier commercial, he combs in the black, he is a just for men client, no question about it. what a ringing endorsement for that fine company. "morning joe" starts right now. as nervous as i was about this whole process, the one thing i didn't lose sleep over was the possibility of taking bin laden out. justice was done. i think that anyone who would question that the perpetrator of mass murder on american soil didn't deserve what he got needs to have their head examined. >> good morning, welcome to "morning joe" on a monday morning. a beautiful picture. monday, may 9th, with us on set,
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msnbc contributor, mike barnicle and "time" magazine and senior political analyst, mark halperin and adjunct studies, and former mayor of washington d.c. you win the title for longest title of the day. >> i will shorten it. it's actually longer. that's the shortened version. >> what does adjunct mean, they don't trust you yet? >> it means you're on probation. >> let's talk about the "60 minutes" interview last night, your blink analysis of the performance. >> he's the decider. he continued his tough focused performance as he did earlier in the week whenever he speak out on this raid and totally confident about it on the outcome. privately, i'm sure they're being firm with pakistan but publicly, very firm. >> i think this pakistan issue
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is headed for a little bit of train wreck and they are quietly trying to, you know, preempt or prepare for that. the reality is what they know, what everybody knows, there is no consensus among pakistani leadership for how to deal with bin laden or deal with the infrastructure that harbored bin laden. that's been the case the past few years and who knows what the case will be the next few years with other terrorist groups. everyone in our government knows it's a real problem and a sense there's no leverage and no way to deal with that. you can hear that in obama's interviews and donneothers as w. perplexed how to do forward with that. >> last night, the president addressed the nation in "60 minutes." in the pays of a week, one line of attack, he has now become commander in chief. >> probably in our lifetime, one of the greatest examples of being the commander in chief
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ever because he's publicized being disguisetive to the entire country and entire world. his goal now is to keep that conversation going at the same time, as i just said, addressing real concerns about whether, if pakistan harbored a climate where-in bin laden could be that close to the center of power, i think everybody's still shocked how close bin laden was to the capital of pakistan and they have some explaining to do. >> he said last night, this is essentially a coin toss whether bin laden was there or not there. he was talking on "60 minutes," the president discussing the risks of the operation his forces faced in pakistan. >> as outstanding a job as our intelligence teams did and i cannot praise them enough. they did and extraordinary job with just the slenderest of bits of information, to piece this all together, at the end of the
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day, this was still a 55/45 situation. we could not say definitively that bin laden was there. had he not been there, there would have been significant consequences. >> in addition to the dangers that accompanied the mission, president obama also had to weigh questions and reject advice from some of his closest national security advisors. >> what i tried to do is every time i sit down in the situation room, every one of my advisors around there knows i expects them to give me their best assessments, so the fact that there were some who voiced doubts about this approach was invaluable because it meant the plan was sharper, it meant that we had thought through all our options, it meant that when i finally did make the decision, i was making it based on the very best information. it wasn't as if any of the folks voicing doubts were voicing something i wasn't already running through in my own head.
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>> the president also said not all of his aides knew about the plan and shared how tight-lipped he had to be, even among his own people. >> one of the great successes of this operation was that we were able to keep this thing secret. it's a testimony to how seriously everybody took this operation and the understanding that any leak could end up not only compromising the mission, but killing some of the guys we were sending in there. very few people in the white house knew. the vast majority of my most senior aides did not know. >> among those who were in the know were members of the president's national security team. he shared last night in 60 minutes the stress he felt as the entire group watched the operation unfold. >> i want go to the situation room. what was the mood? >> tense. >> people talking? >> yeah.
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but doing a lot of listening as well because we were able to monitor the situation in realtime and it was the longest 40 minutes of my life, with the possible exception of when sasha got meningitis when she was 3 months old and i was waiting for the doctor to tell me she was all right. >> the pentagon's chief pentagon correspondent, jim miklaszewski, good morning. >> good morning. >> you know the history well of the pursuit of osama. there were many cases they had perhaps a 50-50 shot and did not go in, whether under president clinton or president bush. take us inside that situation room and before the situation, the decision the president had to make to go get osama bin laden despite this 50-50, 50-45 proposition he mentioned. >> the remarkable thing about all this, with intense intelligence eyes on that compound for about nine or 10 months, intelligence officials
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still were not certain that osama bin laden himself was in there. that's how much he protected his privacy. the compound was constructed in a way, very cleverly, you could not see many areas of it no matter what angle you surveilled it. overhead satellites were useless because they were shooting straight down and never could see the face of osama bin laden. as the president himself said it was a 55-45% likelihood that osama bin laden was there, but the evidence was compelling enough. it wasn't just the eyes on and the listening, it was the following the couriers for nine or ten months and watching the way they moved about that told them there's somebody really important there in and that important was osama bin laden. >> how much do we know about the alleged safe house near the compound, where we had people on the ground for several months? do we know how long?
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do we know what types of people? any afghans or pakistanis involved? what do we know about this? >> clearly, there were pakistanis involved. to put americans, anglos in there would have blown that cover almost immediately. we're told the safe house was somewhere, it wasn't right next door, 3 to 5 kilometers away. one of the problems for those people -- what they did primarily was stake it out from a distance because they didn't want to alert anybody inside. this compound was situated at the end of a dead-end road, so unless you had business at the end of that dead-end, it was difficult for them to even walk by the facility. there are some things that we've been told that, quite frankly, off the record, because they are classified, about the way they got ears and eyes on, partially inside that compound. but it was a tough nut to crack. osama bin laden and his like around him were pretty clever in concealing his presence. >> and part of the operation,
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the decision the president made, too, was to go in with people and not bomb from the air. we know that was part of the decision that president clinton had to make in the late '90s, didn't want to kill civilians at this camp so the president decided to go in small and precise. >> right. in iraq, when our forces went in to get hussein or hussein's sons, u.s. forces were occupying the country, we had 100,000 troops, we had total control of airspace. for the president to go deep into a country that doesn't want us there, we don't have sovereignty and don't have the airspace and go in deep, an operation that's the tough call and probably the type of operation, you can only do once. is there a sense within the pentagon this is it, our government could not get away with an operation like this again, given the pakistani government's reaction to it and now the spotlight on it? >> i wouldn't rule it out. however, osama bin laden was a once in a lifetime shot here.
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they did roll the dice, all chips were in, however you want to describe it. they had to do what they did and certainly not inform the pakistani government that they were going to do it, because in previous operations, when they were going after mid to lower level targets, they would share that information with the pakistanis, only to find by the time the predator drone got there to fire the self-fire missile, those targets were long gone. there were serious inspectisusp about that. in terms of the pakistani-u.s. relationship, it will be tested early this week. the pakistani intelligence gathered up who was left at that compound, seven women, 15 children, three of osama bin laden's wives. they've been interrogating the women and the u.s. has po lightedly asked if they could get some of that information or take part in the interrogations. so far, the pakistanis have not allowed that to happen. >> mark halperin, it has been
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interesting to watch tom donnelin yesterday pretty much lean over pakistan saying we will find out what you people knew. >> this is america's national security advisor coming out. he hasn't done a lot of media, came out with great performance and sending a message to congress and some american people and pakistan the u.s. isn't going to let this drop. we actually have very little leverage over this country. they're the ones who support the taliban. if it weren't for pakistan, the war in afghanistan would probably not be necessary the way it is now. this has been a bad relationship before. this teases it out in the open and gets attention of members of congress. as you suggest, tom was pretty direct yesterday and said we will demand answers and the president said the same in "60 minutes." >> were you surprised the president didn't get a larger bump in the polls. we don't want to make this about poll numbers and people said, my gosh, he's the guy that got
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osama bin laden and his polls will spike. he got a spike but a modest one and it will probably come back to earth as we get into a fight in deficit. >> i would have wanted him to, but i'm sure his insiders wanted him to. more and more elections are coming down to people's emotions and how they feel. one of the greatest concerns he wouldn't have seemed strong enough going into the re-election. i think this changes that completely and the more it's publicized in the media, the more people hear about this amazing decision with very shaky odds to get it done. as we said before, he seems as much like a commander in chief as wave seen in our lifetime. i think all those concerns - concerns -- emotions will be high, even if the polls didn't bump as much as you would have expected. >> these national security events have a small shelf life. look at carter, camp david
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accords, big moment in his policy. it helped him in the mid-terms only to get decimated by reagan. if the world is a mess as they were at the end of that decade leading up to the reagan victory, i don't think people are saying, well, he had this great moment a year and a half ago, if the military is up in flames, our military seems stretched, this event is important but not defining. >> it's hard for people to. >> it's hard to get what could have gone right because people keep explaining what went right. >> and the president now negotiations from a position of strength and the republicans will respect him now when he walks into a negotiating room. would you like to deal with that? >> there is no indication of that whatsoever. there are two columnists in the
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"new york post" who normally write very negative things about the president saying, great, he's strong and tough, that's about the only thing i've seen in scouring data to suggest he will have a stronger hand dealing with his domestic agenda. >> the treasure trove of intelligence that the seals picked up and took back, have you encountered anybody walking along the corridors of the pentagon going, wow, you won't believe this, you won't believe that? >> the intel officials i talked to are absolutely giddy about what they found, because they feel, first, it contains names, addresses, phone numbers, contacts, looking for bank accounts in particular, just like in political scandals, follow the money. they also believe -- here's a side effect to all this. even if they don't have the names, those operators out there have to believe the u.s. has
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their names. quite frankly, the attorney general, eric holder, before congress, just two days after, said they already did find names they have now put on the watch list around the world, to keep an eye on. so those operators have to be leery. who can i trust? are the s.e.a.l.s closing in on me as i'm sitting here? as i talked to one intelligence official saturday, he suggested that since it was the courier, osama bin laden's most trusted courier that led the u.s. and navy s.e.a.l.s to osama bin laden, he suggested we should be looking for a trail of dead couriers around the world. >> do you expect that in this treasure trove of intelligence, it will clear up, conflicting reports he liked pepsi, some people say he liked coke, do we know what it's going to be? any indication? >> still conflicting reports because one market operator said they were buying pepsi, another said they were buying coke.
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it's the blind told taste test. >> i got him for a pepsi man. jim miklaszewski, great reporting as always. thanks so much. appreciate you being with us. up next, "politico"'s top scoops out of washington and "mad money"'s jim cramer will join us and transportation secretary, ray lahood will be here and congressman aaron schock of illinois. if you like great weather, hopefully you live in new england and mid-atlantic. this will be a fantastic week. we will continue the great trend, fantastic mother's day. look at this today, 75 and sunny in d.c., philly, north carolina, harvard, very nice. minneapolis not so nice. where the thunderstorms are a lot of heavy rain moving through. forecast today, hot and steamy in texas, all the way through new orleans. possible travel delays from chicago to the twin cities. you're watching "morning joe" on
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this monday morning brewed by starbucks. ÷
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welcome back to "morning joe." "usa today," u.s. troops fighting in afghanistan are experiencing some of the greatest psychological stress and lowest morale in five years of fighting according to a new military study. mental health strain was most severe among veterans of three or more deployments with a third of those showing signs of psychological problems. "wall street journal," chief executives at the biggest u.s. companies saw pay jump sharply as boards rewarded them for price growth. topping the list, $84 million in compensation. >> a bad year. >> what was his name?
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>> philip dauman. >> jersey shore gets the boot from italy and they have revoked permits from the cast and crew to film. >> there's a list of medications found in bin laden's compound shows none were used to treat long term chronic illness, including kidney failure, however they did find the al qaeda leader was apparently using herbal viagra. >> okay. that's a little more than we need. let's stay on pepsi. >> who-hoo. >> mike allen with a look at the political playbook. >> hello. >> "politico" reporting google and apple executives heading to capitol hill for a hearing. what's the latest? >> this is going to be a juicy hearing. senator al franken from
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minnesota will chair this and we will have top officials answering questions about stories about the ability of smartphones and tablets to track where they've been and record that information and in some cases retain it. lawmakers are looking at a number of possible laws to put in there. you can expect a bunch of them to pile on here. we have a little whiff of it friday, ed markey of massachusetts, congressman joe barton of texas proposing a do not track bill for minors which would require web companies including google andr yahoo! an device makers about retaining information collected about their kids. >> do we know is steve jobs going to be there tomorrow? i know he's addressed this the last couple of weeks and did an interview and talked about this privacy issue. will he be in washington?
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>> he won't be here. they talked about this message and seriously it goes to the very top. this will be public policy officials taking the slings and arrows tomorrow. lawmakers i talked to said they sort of knew what cookies were and sort of knew this could occur. there have been a number of revelations including this ongoing series in the "wall street journal" that make it clear collecting, aggregating, selling this information is a big business for a lot of websites. i think that surprised lawmakers and they want to do something about it. >> you also heard john boehner -- you all right there? get him some water. >> my herbal -- >> get mike allen some water. unfortunately, there's no one else at "politico," as you can see behind him. not one other person. >> they're out getting stories, news doesn't occur in this newsroom. >> whatever you need to tell yourself. >> we understand john boehner is here talking to the wall street crowd. what's he doing?
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>> his number two, eric cantor ringing the wall street bell tomorrow. both up there, trying to reassure wall street about the fact their plans to demand big cuts are not going to derail. the debt ceiling will not cause problems for the markets. john boehner speaking at 7:00 tonight to the economic club of new york, live streaming and on facebook. he will be talking about gas prices and other consumer topics. burt his big message to wall street is that he wants to reassure them and make the case he's going for immediate cuts in the budget rather than longer range targets the democrats are talking about, he wants to be specific and wants to be now. the fact both those guys are up there, will raise a little money, also a sign of the fact wall street has become very important to house republican politics. they need support of wall street if they're to play "hardball"
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with the administration. >> is that a good visual for john boehner and eric cantor to ring the bell, curious, we're here for you wall street, taking care of you? >> they're trying to get big business on their side not just for campaign contributions but this fight. if the business community tells the white house we want this done, it will get a lot of leverage because the white house wants business on their side. >> thank you, mike and we will let you go and thanks for a look inside the "politico" playbook. why documents taken from bin laden's compound are raising red flags about our country's train system. more on that coming up as well. phil jackson quotes richard nixon as his hall of fame coaching career ends in ugly fashion. barnicle, highlights next in sports. boy, i'm glad we got aflac huh.
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welcome back to "morning joe." what a beautiful building. looking northwest, central park, upper west side, hudson river. nice view. isn't that nice? not making this up, don't have a single window in my office. i can see your place there. you actually can. i won't reveal much more.
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officials say afghan security forces have killed a group of taliban insurgent who launched attack over the weekend and left more than two dozen militants dead. the assault was aimed to seize control of kandahar as part of the taliban's annual spring offensive. almost a dozen government buildings were targeted in the fight. officials had barricaded themselves inside a city hotel. new york senator chuck schumer is getting serious about train security, he says, after documents taken from bin laden's compound show al qaeda's plans to attack the united states rail system. schumer wants to apply the same no-fly list restrictions homeland security uses for airlines to amtrak to keep suspected terrorists off our trains? >> by alerting law enforcement about passengers on the no-fly list, we've been able to catch and deter terrorists from boarding our planes.
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we can too the same on amtrak, a rail system that requires tickets to be purchased in the same way. so what we're calling for very simply is for amtrak to put in place a do not ride list. >> transportation secretary ray lahood will be our guest in the next hour. the train safety will be one of our topics. people along the mississippi river are bracing for record flood levels after weeks of heavy rain. in memphis, it's expected to reach its peak tomorrow. officials are going door-to-door warning people along the river to abandon their homes. and bobby jindal is asking to relieve flood levels and people along the gulf of mexico could be affected by these floods. let's turn to sports. until a couple days ago, phil jackson had never been down by
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three games in a playoff series and certainly not swept. yesterday, it was almost certainly his last game as an nba coach. lakers trying to three -peat. find themselves on the wrong side. it was a run away from here. terry with another long ball. mavs went into halftime with a 24 point lead. this thing was over. nine three-pointers from jason terry. 31 points. lakers down 26 in the fourth quarter, things turn ugly. lamarr odom slams into dirk nowitzki puts him down to the deck. oh dochl called for a flagrant foul and ejected from the game. just 45 seconds later. a brutal cheap shot from andrew bynum, gives a forearm to berea while he was in the air and moving to the conference finals, phil jackson criticized earlier
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confirmed after game four this is likely the end of his career. >> this is in all my hopes and aspirations are, this is the final game i'll coach. this has been a wonderful run. i go out with a sour note after being fined $35,000 this morning by the league, so that's not fun. having a feeling like i've been chased on the freeway by them. as richard nixon says, you won't be able to kick this guy around anymore. >> i grew up, you know, under him, so the way i approach things and think about things not only basketball, life in general, a lot of it comes from him because i've been around him so much. it's a little weird for me to think about what next year is going to look like.
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>> phil jackson ends his coaching career with 11 nba titles the most of any coach in any four major sports. he won six with michael jordan and bulls in '90s and five with kobe and shaq. >> why don't you take it a little seriously there. let me ask you, brett armback, remember that? did he ever lose control of his team as this guy lost? >> that was one quarter, not a reflection of his entire career. >> what do you think of him ending his career by quoting richard nixon? >> get on the helicopter and get out of town. >> derek rose looking to go up. in the fourth quarter, rose hits a floater and the foul putting bulls up by three. the mvp this season, 34 points and 10 assists in the game in atlanta. josh smith led the hawks, dishes
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it here to al horford for the game clenching throwdown. hawks outscore in the fourth quarter, win by 12, that series tied at two games apiece. you will love this next story. baseball, yankees and rangers, how about this comeback story for derek jeter, just last week, "new york times" pointing out on the front page, he had zero home runs basically signalling the end of the jeter era. in article, the captain answered, off david bush, and nearly an identical shot in the seventh inning. curtis brander son goes back to back using the pink bat on mother's day. yankees win 12-5. what an information for derek y jeter come all the way back after being slammed in the papers, setting a terrific
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example. >> i will surprise you. i hope he does well. a classy guy. yes, he is. i hope the does well for eventually their fourth placed team. >> you don't mean a word of that. peeking of fourth place, i have standings, yankees and rays tied for first and boston -- >> a great moment in the history of television news, courtesy of the shake weight. boy, is this good. "news you can't use" coming up. ♪ sun in the sky
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earlier today, the pentagon released a tape seized in sunday's raid in pakistan reporting to be osama bin laden's last will and testament. >> i leave the decision to my executors provided wherever it is naidoo not bur is, they do not bury me at sea. as my family well knows i have a deathly fear of being eaten by fish so i'm very serious about this. do not bury me at sea. third, as executors to this, my last will and testament, i name my dear friends at the pakistani intelligence services. they are solid, reliable people, and may i add, among the few individuals a person can still trust in this corrupt cynical world we live in. >> fred, as osama bin laden written and voiced over by the
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legendary "snl" writer, jim downey on saturday night. let's do must read op-eds. what have we found? >> i found max butin, "wall street journal," bin laden's death changes little but the gains achieved so far are tenuous and reversible. taliban are back on the offensive. if we give more time to general petreus and his successor, john allen, they can strengthen enough to prevent a taliban takeover or a ruinous civil war even after u.s. forces start drawing down. that in turn can help us stabilize pakistan. >> the big objective of the war has been creating conditions
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that can prevent al qaeda from having a harbor in afghanistan. does the death of bin laden, perhaps symbolically and strategic reasons does it mean al qaeda is no longer relevant and mean these groups couldn't reconstitute themselves if we left. >> you're very wired in that world. do you bump into anybody who really believes in 10 year's time afghanistan will be any different than it is today? >> the standard people in the community school of thought supporting staying in afghanistan at least for the next two or three years is it will still be a largely dysfunctional society, politically, military and economically. the question is, can it be moderately stable with a much reduced u.s. nato footprint as well as real infrastructure, military presence in the region. it won't be perfect, jeffersonian dreemocracy, will
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be stable? if this kill in bin laden results in expedited withdrawal, is there a sense including the pentagon we have to go in at some point. if we have to go in, it will cost more and be messier. >> is there anything that could happen that will make you think whether the war was worth it? >> whether the war in afghanistan was worth it? thames of thousands of al qaeda person yell being trains in afghanistan, history of taliban harboring terrorist groups. and no since that has changed. taliban still working with terrorist groups and no indication if we cut some deal they would change and no sense the terrorists groups would seize on a failed state in that part of the world all next door to a country sitting on 100 nuclear weapons. a scary scenario, that doesn't mean i support the way the war was fought. i have a lot of criticisms about
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underresourcing and lack of counter insurgency strategist strategist -- strategy a number of years but i don't support the way we went in that failed state there. >> do you see bin laden's death changing the future. the president said we did what we said we would do and now come home. i'm not sure i see a straight line between those two? >> i see regular people trying to figure out and government trying to figure out how much of support for bin laden or the taliban is either being ignored or fostered by those close to the governments of pakistan and afghanistan. one of the things i look closely at, all the information that comes out from the raid and interviews, one of the reasons they're trying to interview the widows and anybody else in the compound, find out who are these
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people? obviously not the government of pakistan but is it people who they knew of who they just ignored. don't forget the obama administration is still new. they're probably finding out a lot of information maybe they weren't getting assistance from pakistan they hope they were getting. >> it would be ironic if the key to ending our phase, our time in afghanistan would lie in through pakistan, that in this treasure trove, as they call it, of intelligence, there is a key in there that allows us to lean on pakistan, that largely funds or turns a blind eye to the taliban to say, hey, here's what i've got, we can topple your government, then you will have big problems with india by toppling your government if we release this information so help us push these guys into some position in afghanistan. >> not impossible. one thing not on the news is the president is on the phone talking to other leaders around the world, some congratulatory and i believe in some cases the
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discussing what the next steps will be by not just the president but others around the region saying things have to change. >> washington has already pivoted from bin laden to the conversation about the deficit. you're writing about this in your note you sent last night the potential you've been calling all along a grand bargain between the president and democrats and republicans. where are we as we pick the story up after a week and a half? >> a mystery, unknowns what will happen. reknow republicans a reknow -- we know republicans are not backing off, they want major deficit things to happen, some strurktu tustructural and and some believe we will get a mini grand bargain and big grand bargain with major overhaul of entitlement programs may not
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come before the election. i still think it may be a big deal. >> what would be in a grand bargain? >> grand bargain would be the trillions of spending cuts republicans are demanding and how future beneficiaries of medicaid and medicare will get their benefits. i don't think that structural change will happen in the short term. they have to get real savings or republicans won't back down. they have public opinion on their side. they have the strength and still do despite the president getting national security victory. >> major fenty, does washington have the capability, will to make a grand bargain, make the kind of compromises, perhaps at their own political expense to make the country fiscally solvent going forward? >> two things, one, the election is a lot closer than people realize, the primaries will be here before we know it. because of that, i would say, no. two, there still doesn't seem the -- the conversation from
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extremists on both sides to put in their biggest chips, be it medicare on the left or some types of things in defense or other things on the right. it doesn't look like it would happen that soon. if it does, i think that it would change the political debate because then people trying to run against obama would have to say what their plan is and their strategy is. it will be more hit him on what he hasn't done over the past three years. i think that's another reason it won't come up. >> we'll see. coming up, "mad money," jim cramer, more on this deficit debate and more "news you can't use." tina fey reprices her sarah palin character. she's still got it. >> she does. [ male announcer ] edmunds.com says that lexus holds its value better than any other luxury brand.
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time for news you can't lose. if you saw "snl" saturday night, you saw tina fey hosting. that means one thing, sarah palin is back, bringing back the character she made famous during the 2008 campaign during a fake presidential campaign. >> it's great to be back on fox
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news that pays me and show mess the questions ahead of time. i will be in the middle east filming a cameo in hangover three, the third hangover, fellows go to a bar and i'm there. i also recently purchased rosetta stone english. i want to acknowledge this week we finally vanquished one of the world's great villains and i for one am thrilled to say good riddance to katie couric. >> still got it, don't you think? >> she's darned good. sharp. >> anybody use the shake weight to tone-up the arms? >> i don't want to talk about it. >> i was a pioneer. >> this is ktla in los angeles, known for some of their lightweight shows.
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watch. >> shaking with excitement at the prospect of taking part in this new shake weight class. allie, is it bet tore go slter or fast? >> you vary it. something i noticed doing the shake weight, there's a little mirror on the top. >> is that where the -- >> i always wondered -- >> is that where the cool-down spray comes out? >> no. that's actually only on south park. >> it's mark here. they asked me to join in. i have a small white one. does that make a difference? >> no. >> no. but that -- >> i want to point out i had nothing to do with that. >> that's going on the peabody reel. how's this for transition?
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the pope was in venice yesterday. i wanted to see if i was going to burst in flames. no. i'm still here. the pope was in venice giving a lovely mass there. the first time since pope john paul the 2iin2n iind plds wrds that's a gondola. >> they didn't put the cover on it. >> cruising through the canals in venice looking good. not the best of all time from a few short months ago. let's watch. >> this is verging on the
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sacrilegious. >> he did it. i didn't make this up. this was at the vatican, like a circque du soleil kind of thing. >> is that the original music? >> yes. we don't doctor video here. >> we just report the news. that was news, in our eyes. >> there you have it. 92 this just across the wire. >> what are you getting? >> stuff taken out of bin laden's cave, the galleys of a book called "loaded by willie geist. you got another book on the market? >> another one coming out tomorrow. i think you will enjoy it. you hated the last worn, barnicle, you will actually like this one, a spoof of the get rich quick, lose weight fast books dominating the best-seller book. my friend, boyd mcdonnell and i wrote it. >> for those in new jersey who have no life, that's all of you,
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a book signing at 7:00, books & greetings. willie will be there. jim cramer won't be there. >> but he will be here in just a minute. cramer joins us next along with transportation secretary ray lahood. ♪ it's a new day i'm loving weight watchers new pointsplus program and the edge it's giving me. ♪ and i'm feeling good go on, join for free. weight watchers new pointsplus.
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[ whacking piñata, grunting ] [ technician ] are you busy? management just sent over these new technical manuals. they need you to translate them into portuguese. by tomorrow. [ male announcer ] ducati knows it's better for xerox to manage their global publications. so they can focus on building amazing bikes. with xerox, you're ready for real business. and here's what we did today in homes all across america: we created the electricity that powered the alarm clocks and brewed the coffee. we heated the bathwater and gave kelly a cleaner ride to school.
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pakistan that wasn't aware of this. >> it seems to me very logical, osama bin laden was in that home six years of time, a group of people there connected with the military, a lot of people in pakistan knew about his whereabouts. >> if bin laden can have this kind of access to the government and get protection, if that's the case, we don't know that it is, what does that say about the nuclear weapons and the military force there and how secure it really is? >> good questions all. welcome back to "morning joe," just after 7:00, new york city, mike barnicle, mark halperin, dan seymour and geting back to even, by joe cramer. we want to mention joe and mika at the funeral services held for joe scarborough in the pensacola area. joe wants me to pass along how much he appreciates the thoughts
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and wishes and prayers you have sent along via e-mail to this show. he' he'll be back as soon as they're ready and joe wanted me to express his thanks for your thoughts and prayers. we will get back to pakistani. let's talk about jobs numbers friday. the number goes to 9%, symbolic but we added 244,000 jobs. how do we read the number? >> the number is incredibly strong, the third straight month. this is beginning to be a hiring period for america. the averages didn't show it because a lot of what is happening now is tied into what's going on with the euro and greece. i think that's a sideshow. what really does matter is the strength of the u.s. economy and how it's building. i have to tell you, it is without a doubt a very real recovery. do not believe anyone who says it's not because the hiring is there. >> what are you seeing in the economy? you look at this stuff everyday, where are we growing? >> incredible strength.
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a lot export. a lot of people building here who were thinking of building overseas, the cost of building something in china has skyrocketed. a lot of companies -- no one wants to move to mexico because of the drug wars. two countries taking a lot of jobs, siphoning a lot of jobs shut down, jobs staying here, caterpillar classic example, gigantic report, hiring and hiring in the rails and hiring in trucking, hiring in oil, hiring in building pipelines. i see it across the board and particularly companies making goods we're exporting. >> how big a drag on the economy is the housing market? >> not nearly as much. housing market has become 8, 9% of the economy, completely overplayed in the headlines, not the driver it once was. imagine what would happen if it came back. caterpillar, great example still only half where they were in 2006 because of housing. the economy has managed to adjust, it put housing in the rear view mirror, retail sales
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very strong, exports strong. auto, very strong. 14 million cars built and back to the housing days, don't overlook, retail bigger than housing. >> a lot of speculator raised the margin rates and how much we had to speculate in silver, that had been the red hot market. trick that bubble, a lot of oil down. oil down in three days, the economy bubble is being pricked, good for most american industries because the cost of building things have gone up too dramatically because of speculators in part. >> does that mean we avoid a gas spike in the summer? >> yes. without a doubt, we saw how much this was related to the dollar being weak, dollar is weak this morning so oil demand goes down. we have a glut here and in
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europe and a glut in asia. the prices have been really kind of marked up entirely because of hedge funds hoarding oil with very little margin rates. >> why isn't the guy putting $25 worth of gas in his car next to me yesterday morning, why isn't he as optimistic about the future as you seem to be? >> first of all, his costs at the supermarket and pump have gone up. a lot of costs at the supermarket related to ethanol, the decision by this government to prop up the price of oil in the food chain. and a lot related to margins to bring down the price of oil. you may say you're keying too much on speculators we have seen over and over again the speculator have the price of oil far beyond the demand. >> we're talking about wall street. does wall street want to see big spending reductions by the
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federal government and would the real economy react well or take a hit because of less government spending? >> the longer term view is bonds substantially lower, interest rates higher if it weren't for bernanke, we have a chance to avoid what happened in greece, avoid what's happening in spain, we are on that trajectory. people are very worried. there are great minds, we ridicule wall street constantly but the guys who do control trillions say this is the fulcrum moment we have to get this done not just debt ceiling, a radical valuation how we handle the deficit and interest rates stay down after bernanke finished buying bonds, it would be a huge positive. people are worried about us being a casualty just like what we're seeing right now in spain and portugal. >> does the end of qe-2 mean this levitation you're talking about in the market come down. we have gotten huge monetary
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stimulus, it's over. the fiscal stimulus money has been spent and monetary stimulus about to disappear. >> we're still not in a strong enough economy to sustain that. i think bernanke knows that. we only had three months of hiring. the german economy, came out this morning, is the strongest it's ever been in the history of germany. we need to catch up a little bit to germany to get there. don't forget china raising rates, europe raised rates not last week, brazil raising rates and india, we're nowhere be able to do that. i think bernanke gets it. i think they will quietly be buying bonds in the so-called moment after we're supposed to shut down. we don't have that level of hiring. still dim for the man pumping gasoline. much of it is midwest oriented where we still make things. >> talking about hiring trends. >> the trends are good. interesting the president taking no credit because they're still worried about people on the
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fringe, not been able to be brought in. this is a moment in the economy better,not so great the government can relent and cut off liquidity but not so bad out there. i'm not just being a kocock-eye optimist. >> is there a new class called the chronically unemployed? >> you have to feel there is, not responsive to the government programs, a notion in the country unless we stimulate real jobs that require manual labor, building millions of literally miles and miles of pipeline, 60,000 dollars to $80,000 jobs, if you look at states where the unemployment rate is low, states, wyoming, north dakota, even to some degree, all the midwest that has natural gas and oil, that's where the jobs are, louisiana, a lot of jobs, texas, a lot of jobs, all related to oil. otherwise, the coasts are not doing as well. but california did have a big pickup in hiring and
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california's budget deficit is really good. the layoffs were government jobs, not industrial jobs. that's a very good switch because that's sustainable. >> that that's the president's big domestic question, foreign policy-wise he has a lot on his plate. for the first time revealing behind the scenes details on "60 minutes" on the raid of osama bin laden's compound. on the interview, he said he had to decide between some of the suggestions of his closest national security advisors and also talked about details he and his team learned about bin laden's compound. >> i think we were surprised when we learned this compound had been there five or six years and in an area you would think that potentially he would atralkt somea tral tract some attention. we were surprised he could maintain a compound like that for that long without there
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being a tip-off. >> the president told steve croft last night on "60 minutes" it was a 55-45 proposition whether or not osama bin laden was there. they took a big risk going in and it paid off. as the release of bin laden's videos make headline around the world, in pakistan, many are skeptical of the united states account of bin laden's final years. nbc's peter alexander sat down with the head of hack tan sni's intelligen -- head of pakistani's intelligence to get his take. >> it doesn't prove anything, doesn't prove he was in charge, doesn't prove it was the same room of the same house he was living. >> reporter: is it possible osama bin laden lived in abbottabad without the help of the united states military? >> i am absolutely certain it is possible and absolutely certain that the military or the isi did not provide him any advice.
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>> peter alexander, that's a pretty remarkable conversation from one of the former leaders of the intelligence services there suggesting perhaps the united states is involved in some strange conspiracy or something. what else did you learn? >> reporter: interesting you make that point. a pr battle is taking place, u.s. making it clear they believe osama bin laden was strategically in charge at the helm of al qaeda even days before his death in that compound a couple hours away from is sllamabad. >> and in pakistan, they dismissed is senior role as described back home in the united states. we did finish a conversation a short time ago, a tense standoff and a former national security advisor tells nbc news saying it would be impossible for osama
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bin laden to have lived here more than five years without some form of support within the establishment. he says it's highly unlikely he received any help from the senior levels of military intelligence although it's possible help could have come from lower levels, junior ranks, rogue elements here or perhaps higher level officials who have sense retired. >> your conversation with that former official is fascinating. if he says we're not complicit with it that means the isi was ignorant osama bin laden was living 35 miles outside islamabad. i think if the cia new obama was living in greenwich, i think they would have found him in five years. it's a no win situation. they're either dumb or complicit. >> reporter: you're right. the word they used is we're hurt right now. they're upset the u.s. didn't provide them any intelligence in advance of this, came in the
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dark of night, killed osama bin laden left behind seven women, 15 children without any assistance from the pakistanis. they make that point because pakistan, as they would say to me, has turned over 248 al qaeda members over the last nine, 10 years to the united states, including cakhalid shaikh mohamd and some other names they were familiar with that and if only for that, the u.s. should have included them in this process. >> at best, there seems to be disagreement with the intelligence and military communities in pakistan about their views towards the presence of militant and islamic groups in pakistan. even if the presidents or opposed to the presence of these groups, think it's a bad thing for pakistan and the united states, there are some players and some ranks at the mid or lower ranks,don't think it's such a bad idea. do they at least acknowledge that fact and laying out how they will get to the bottom of
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it and weeding out who these elements are within the national security infrastructure somewhat sympathetic to these terrorist affiliates? >> reporter: that's an important point you make. we have heard very little from the pakistani government in this last week since the raid took place. we heard from barack obama the night it took place and saw him last night on "60 minutes." here silence from the president and prime minister. we will hear from the prime minister ghailani a short time from now. it should happen in a few hours at the parliament building behind us, his first official comments and indicate there is intention to launch a formal investigation to get to the bottom of this. the real tense standoff exists between u.s. and pakistan. right now, the u.s. is trying to get access to the three osama bin laden wives at that site at the time. we are learning also one of those wives, according to local media reports, may be ex pate triated, the youngest wife may
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be sent back to her home in yemen. the u.s. wants access to information left behind in that compound and important to note, as we make that point, possible, according to rumors in that community they could be blowing up that compound site that's been cleansed of all evidence any day now, at least that's what the people are expecting. >> we know the obama administration is leaning in hard on the pakistani government for answers. thanks so much. appreciate your reporting. up next, transportation secretary ray lahood to make an exclusive announcement that could affect the future of travel in the united states. first, bill karins. good morning. hope everyone had a wonderful mother's day weekend. if you were with us, this could be our best spring week we will get. warm days, cool nights, in the 70s, highs from hartford to southward to d.c. look at this forecast. temperatures near 70 in new york
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city each and every day. worth weather in this country, minneapolis, thunderstorms. i'm sure there's a lot of thunder out there and lightning strikes widespread and spreads to wisconsin. forecast today, all the stormy bad weather from minneapolis to madison, milwaukee, peoria and that's who will deal with thunderstorms. a heat wave in texas. joining us on the west coast, a little cooler than recently in phoenix at 79.
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by alerting law enforcement
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about passengersen the no-fly list, we have been able to catch and deter terrorists from boarding our planes, we can do the same on amtrak, a rail system that requires tickets to be purchased in this same way. so what we're calling for very simply is for amtrak to put in place a do not ride list. >> new york senator chuck schumer talking about amtrak security. joining us now the secretary of transportation, ray lahood, secretary. >> good morning. >> i want to know what you think about chuck schumer's comments and there was some information the information found inside osama bin laden's compound he was looking at passenger trains. anything you can tell us about that? >> we will look at information found inside his house and see if there were any threats they're thinking about for trains.
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we'll work with congress on this. i'd say this morning, we need to look at the information carefully and see if there are any threats. for now, riding trains is safe. >> based on what you've seen and heard over the last week, you've encouraged people to continue taking the trains? >> absolutely. took the train last evening from washington to new york, from union station to penn station. the train was packed and it was very safe. they have the dogs on there, the dogs that sniff for bombs and things like that. it was very safe. people were enjoying the ride. >> let's talk about why you're here, a big announcement for people who use the trains. the money came back from florida is going to be spread around the country. most importantly, it will be used in the northeast corridor, to fix up tracks and get to higher speeds in the northeast corridor, members of congress have been asking us about.
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we already put out $11 billion over the last 2 1/2 years, this $2 billion will actually go to fix up infrastructure and buy new equipment. it's a great announcement. it will really deliver people in a much quicker way and it will be done pretty quickly. we're not talking about 10 years, we're talking about over the next few years, we're going to get people on trains safe, convenient and will go a little faster. >> you're talking boston, new york -- >> that's correct. >> down to washington, high speed, how fast can we go? >> 150, 160 miles an hour. >> it goes what now? >> 125, 130. a little higher in some places but average, that's about it. but it's also going to make investments in upstate new york. we're going to take and make investments all the way to the state capitol to buffalo and rochester. our goal is to go to the canadian border so people really do have the access.
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all the way south to the carolinas. we just signed agreements with our freight rail friends in north carolina. people really will have good access to very convenient trains they can afford. >> barnicle, you and i have said it, if you can ride a train, you do it because you don't have to go through the security, just a question of them being quicker. >> that leads to the stupid question of the day, if you take the train, you can sense a clamor among people say, if the trains were a little faster, i wouldn't take the u.s. air shuttle, i prefer taking the train. why has this taken so long? >> because no president before ever wanted to make the investment. we ha $8 be $--8 billion in the stimulus bill, put that money out. allowed am track to compete for it and giving it out. because of the president and vice president's vision. no other administration has ever made these kinds of investments, $11 billion so far, $2 billion
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today, the president's got $50 billion in his budget for 2012. it's because, really, of president obama's vision. >> physically, what is this money going to do? >> it will fix up tracks, new rails, fix up tracks to get to higher speeds and also buy new equipment, new cars and more comfortable cars not only in this northeast and midwest but california where we made big investments. >> i'm a constant rider of the train, for much of the last decade, i have ridden next to senator biden. clearly, he understands this. how much is driven by the fact the vice president understands that this is a broken system that we don't want to take -- i have been on that train with him when it's actually just stopped and it stopped because of track problems. he has firsthand experience this ain't working. >> over the last two years, this administration, because of the president and vice president's vision, have put $11 billion
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investment. that's $11 billion times more that's ever been put into high speed rail. the president has $50 billion in his transportation budget he sent up to congress. the president gets it, the vice president gets it. this is what americans want. people are tired of congestion, tired of the congestion on i-95, they want good transportation and alternatives. with prices going up, they will look at trains. >> you're a former senator. florida's governor rejected the money and scott walker rejected the money. what's going on with they're refusing to accept the money information the rail system. >> one of the happiest days for me, i'm going to michigan. michigan has a republican governor. governor schneider and i will stand up and say the state of michigan, under a republican governor, will accept money for the line between detroit and chicago. what a great connection. it will fix up the tracks,it
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will get people there at higher speeds and put michigan in the high speed rail business. >> what about the republicans who don't see it your way? what do they see differently about the world? >> i'm happy 40 places in the country have accepted money including governor schwarzenegger when he was governor of california. they got the largest apt of money. there have been plenty of places around the country that have accepted the money. today is really an important day because we're fixing up tracks, getting to higher speeds, buying equipment and have a republican governor in michigan that will accept the money. >> csx, when you started, had the right of way in florida, you never spoke to them, never spoke to michael ward, told me that many times, came in and blasted your way in without ever speaking to the guys who had the right of way. you never got their buy-in. >> the reason florida didn't accept the money was not because of the freight rail system, that had nothing to do with it. >> it was the -- it was --
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>> there's only one person in florida that didn't want high speed rail, there's only one. there are thousands of people that have been working on high speed rail in florida for 20 years and they are deeply disappointed one guy decided they wouldn't accept the second largest amount of money. they had a good plan from orlando to tampa and orlando to miami. we would have worked it out with our friends in the freight rail. this is one guy only. eventually, florida will get in the high speed rail business. >> we'd rather have the money in the northeast. >> absolutely. >> they did not show the -- >> you can go to the beach quicker. >> you're getting the money. >> great analysis of florida. >> you're getting the headline less than a month ago, u.s. high speed rail program hit by deep budget cuts. some reports say high speed rail lost as much as a billion and half dollars in this budget. how do we square this what you're bringing to us now, where's that money coming from after we lost all that money? >> again, the president, vice president, this administration, $11 billion over the last 2 1/2
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years, another $2 billion today, the president has $50 billion in his budget. we all had to give at the office during these budget negotiations. so there were some people in congress said give up the high speed rail money and we gave at the office. that will not dissuade us from our pursuit of putting high speed rail in america, putting people on trains. this is what americans want, not just ray lahood or barack obama, it's what americans want. what you all have been talking about, you love getting on trains, particularly when you can afford it and it's comfortable and gets you there on time. amtrak has a very good record the last year, making money, trains are on time, comfortable and people can afford them. >> you have to uptick the security a little, don't you think sxwlrchlt. >> we will look at the information that came from bin laden's house, we will. safety is our number one priority at d.o.t.
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want to make sure all transportation is safe. >> and enforcing quiet in the quiet car. >> all right. i'm being the quiet man. >> this is great news. we're excited. we hope you see it through. when can people expect this to actually happen? when will the ride from new york to d.c. be two hours? >> three to five years. >> really? >> absolutely. these investments will come about really quickly. >> ray lahood, thank you so much. >> appreciate it. coming up, he calls her woman of the world. jonathan alter explains what he calls the trillions foansformat secretary hillary clinton. and officials go door-to-door with evacuation notices as floodwaters continue to rise on the mississippi river.
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welcome back to "morning joe." 7:33 in the morning. live picture of the united states capitol. along the banks of the mississippi, floodwaters are
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rising. thousands of homeowners headed for higher ground. memphis is bracing for possible record flooding as officials go door-to-door advocating residents. >> reporter: with the mighty mississippi swallowing more of memphis by the hour, emergency workers are going door-to-door, urging hold-outs to quickly gather what's important and bussing them to higher ground and safety. >> getting my medicines together. >> reporter: evacuation centers like the hope presbyterian church have become sanctuaries for those who made the heart wrenching decision to leave their homes. >> it's heartbreaking in the kids' faces and parents' faces, it's out of their hands. there's nothing they can do about it. >> reporter: on sunday, the engorged river drew spectators who can only watch and wonder as floodwaters crept their way ever closer to record levels, roughly
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48 feet, inches below a record set in 1937. >> this is all astounding. it's just overwhelming to see it so high. interesting. hopefully it won't get much worse. >> reporter: but it may very well do just that. with the crest now coming sooner than originally predicted, the army corps of engineers has deployed more than 150 engineers to check the levees and pump stations. >> in one second, that water in front of us right now or behind us right now would fill up a football field 44 feet deep in one second. >> reporter: while workers place sandbags, as nbc's jay gray learned, in some spots, it's too late for them. >> reporter: for perspective, i'm standing in an area normally a play ground for kids at a montessori school. it's now literally a part of the river. you look behind me, you can see a row of houses there. what you can't see is they have a lower level that's been swallowed by the water.
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>> reporter: forecasters say it could take weeks for the water to recede in memphis. in mississippi, it's just as dire. two sisters who survived a 1947 flood that left some 700 homeless are in their 90s now and facing another historic flood. >> nothing we can do about it. it gets high, we have to get out. >> janet shambly reporting for us from memphis this morning. coming up next from controversial to consistent, how secretary hillary clinton has become one of the president's most trusted advisors. she joins us next to talk about his new piece. we'll be right back. a lot of times, things are right underneath our feet,
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and all we need to do is change the way we're thinking about them. a couple decades ago, we didn't even realize just how much natural gas was trapped in rocks thousands of feet below us. technology has made it possible to safely unlock this cleanly burning natural gas. this deposits can provide us with fuel for a hundred years, providing energy security and economic growth all across this country. it just takes somebody having the idea, and that's where the discovery comes from.
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you didn't tell anybody in the pakistani government or military or their intelligence community. >> no. >> because you didn't trust them? >> as i said, i didn't tell most people here in the white house. i didn't tell my own family. it was that important for us to maintain operational security. >> but you were carrying out this operation in pakistan. >> yes. >> you didn't trust them? >> if i'm not revealing to some of my closest aides what we're doing, then i'm sure as heck not going to be revealing it to folks i don't know. >> president obama on "60 minutes" last night. nbc contributor columnist from bloomberg review, jonathan altar, and "vanity fair," this month's issue. a remarkable role reversal. four years ago in the heat of campaign, hillary clinton the
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favorite, barack obama was the underdog at the time. what's their relationship like now? >> i think they have a strong working relationship. they see each other several times a week. it's not what you would call a close personal relationship but why should it be, given all the history that they have. there's nothing dysfunctional about it. except for a little bit of staff squabbling one might expect they get along well and have remade america's reputation in the world. it's huge turnaround. remember, all the people who dined out on despising hillary clinton, they won't talk now. i look for them, when i was writing this story to see whether there were still people out there who really thought that she was a problem, and they're not there. pretty much everybody acknowledges she's a bright dutiful and pretty effectively secretary of state. >> that's been the remarkable thing to me, she was a villain, let's be honest, a few years ago, the easiest person in
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american political life to take shots at, to criticize. now, she's lauded almost everyday for the job she's done as secretary of state. >> remember, when she was a united states senator, she had a great reputation as well. it was only when she entered the presidential race things changed for her. now, all the traits she has, even her critics and enemies says she works hard, she's prepared, and she cares about the country and likes to think creatively about solutions, all that she's able to do in this job? >> what a job she walked into. you could go down the list of what she's encountered most recently with the arabs, and she's jetting around to different countries in the region. >> i just tried to kind of get behind closed doors, that's what i try to do in the promise for the president, i tried to do that this time, for the secretary of state because i think people do want to know what she's like, say, aboard her plane where she's put in more than half a million miles.
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it is a tremendously fatiguing job. i would come back after traveling with her and i would just be completely wiped out and she would be going to the oval office, you know, to meet with the president, fresh as a daisy. so her ability to do that and be effective and be on at every stop, mastering the subtleties of this very complicated job is impressive. >> she gets extremely high marks for the job she's done as secretary of state. she's sort of indicated that one term, that's it and she's going to leave. we don't know, perhaps you know, whether that's accurate or not, but there is nothing that she can do to put to bed, you know, the feeling that she will still some day run for president. >> i heard that, mike. she has said pretty clearly that she will leave after four years. so in 2013, she will leave and
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she will devote herself to some of these non-profits she's been involved with, particularly those concerning women and children. but in 2016, she will be 68 years old, a very young 68. i don't see the democratic party at this point turning to anybody else. obviously, pretty early. but i would not be at all surprised, if she was the democratic nominee. >> what if joe biden wants to run? >> joe biden's actually older, and he has not been indicating that kind of thing at all. i guess it's possible you could see something like that. i detailed their relationship, which hit on a professional level, a rocky patch over escalation in afghanistan, but they tried to work through it by having breakfast or lunch every week, they call each other "dear" and have a long and pretty close relationship they worked hard to restore recently.
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>> are you concerned at all she flip-flopped on syria, initially pro the regime and now trying to back out like many other leaders, trying to back out, not support this guy? >> there's been a lot of back and forth. she said that egypt was stable, quote-unquote 17 days before mubarak fell. so they are on very treacherous ground with this arab spring. in some cases, she's been clairvoyant and actually said these foundations are sinking in the sand. shortly before the demonstrations erupted. other times, a little bit behind the curve. one of the things that really interests me, is that for both clinton and obama, they are now more protected politically since the bin laden killing. this is something i think has not been entirely clear. remember, he had a lot of people talking about, they're soft on terrorism, they aren't standing up for america, they are apologizing for america,
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remember all these kinds of comments. if we had been hit with even a small scale terrorist attack before bin laden was killed, there would be a lot of people pointing fingers at the obama administration saying they let security lapse. now, if we're hit, again, god forbid, most likely, they will rally around the president the way they did around president bush after 9/11. it's true that over time there will be other issues. this doesn't guarantee obama's re-election or anything like that. but it does offer some measure of protection because if we had been hit without this, it would have been hell to pay for the obama administration politically. >> before we let you go, quickly, a great bit of color secretary clinton not just foreign policy but talking how to handle the budget fight, given her experience in the '90s. >> yeah. she counseled the other cabinet members on how to make sure when they're cutting they don't cut in ways that are going to, you
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know, cause them political problems. she went back to the '90s, when newt gingrich, when they cut school lunches and she was explaining, that was one of the ways the clinton administration got the initiative over gingrich, was when he would go after things that were very popular politically. we're seeing that now on medicare again. did try to throw in a lot of the color. on her plane, she uses one of these binders they put on classified documents normally, she has it on her hair to make sure her hair looks pretty good when she gets off the plane. >> life on the road. >> pretty interesting. >> a great piece. new piece in "vanity fair," hillary clinton, woman of the world, written by jonathan alter. >> appreciate it. coming up, calling him the fittest man in congress, representative aaron schock about using rippling ads to reduce the deficit.
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pretty good pictures. and football frenzy, well, the fittest member of some group, we don't know which one. roger bennett. >> my favorite segment we have someone on i have no idea what he's saying or means. >> it doesn't matter because it's said with a british accent. ] finally. the place they've been searching for. the one place that makes it easy to buy a new laptop. or get one fixed. with highly trained tech experts, staples makes repairing technology easy. staples. that was easy.
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making money and who was sitting around trying to make money? >> just making phone calls, trying to raise money. >> walks in -- >> cramer last night on the apprenti apprentice. >> that guy was a water works. strange. business man? weak. okay? weak is the way, be a diplomat. >> nice to see you class up a show like that. >> thank you. i took it to another level. >> putting him in the song. >> but the president did indicate, these are tough
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decisions for mr. trump. he said that getting rid of mr. meatloaf, trying to make these tough decisions is a presidential timber. >> star jones had to go. could you explain her jacket. >> i decided to wear it to have the application numbers soar. >> roger bennett, espn soccer analyst and just one of the great people on the face of this earth. haven't seen you since london. >> i like to be where no one understands me. >> we're talking, this is the sport where they kick the ball. >> it was a huge weekend. it really was. this league has been like an egg and spoon race. the teams have been stumbling to the finish line. this is the big one. manchester united against chelsea. easy to find a neutral than the
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iraq war. doesn't take long to, 36 seconds, the tyson mcneilly fight lasted longer than this. a serbian -- chelsea did get a -- get one back, but manchester units, one point and two games to go from a record breaking title. o the new york red bulls. >> how many goals did they score? >> in america, you get seven points. you can kind of, gloat over that, but the quality and consistency -- played manchester city, united emirates, playing everton, everything but money.
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soccer's equivalent of upstairs, downstairs. toure, if i have a fifth child, i will call him yaya. look at this one. the second goal by osman. this one, osman, smallest man on the pitch. papa smurf towers over this. let's see that one again. first in the face. you will not see a better headed goal this season. he's about 4'3". >> that's unreal. >> character and position do bags of cash sometimes. >> how did tottenham do? >> tottenham and the other team are vying for european place. from the seaside heights -- jersey shore. like a pub tee. gomez, he has the mind past bill buckner.
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and then gave away one immediately in 30 seconds, but last the second one home. 30 seconds. look at him. you would love this man, barnicle. three points and midseason can go to aaa. >> relegated, you call it. >> here in america. the greatest pub team in the world remain in the bottom three. on tuesday, manchester city hosts tottenham. >> do they have like a little tournament? >> everyone will be watching. come out to my house. >> i deeply resent that cheap shot. coming from someone who dresses like school crossing guards. >> even as a yankee fan, i don't
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go to the buckner reference. roger bennett, we love you. thank you so much. coming up, the latest on the treasure-trove of intelligence seized from bin laden's compound. ♪ it's a new day it's a new day. i'm feeling healthy! ♪ it's a new day [ valerie ] weight watchers new pointsplus takes the stress out of losing weight. ♪ a new dawn, a new day, a new life ♪ i was ready to change my life, and that's exactly what i did. on weight watchers, i've lost 83 lbs. it just works. it's a new day. i have my whole life in front of me. it's the best feeling in the world. [ jennifer ] go on, join for free. weight watchers new pointsplus. because it works.
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i made the decision thursday night, informed my team friday morning and we flew out to look at the tornado damage, go to
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cape canaveral, made the speech then we had the white house c y dinner. this was in the back of my mind all weekend. >> just the back? >> middle, front. >> good morning, welcome to "morning joe." it's 8:00 on the east coast as you take a live look at the beautiful morning in manhattan. returning to set, mike barnicle, mark halperin, and the former mayor of washington, d.c., mr. adri adrian fenty. let's talk about the "60 minutes interview." >> he's the decider. he continued his tough focused
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performance as he did earlier in the week and he's totally confident about the outcome and i'm sure they're being firmer with pakistan. >> dan? >> i feel the same way. i think the pakistan issue is headed for a little bit of a train wreck and they are quietly trying to you know, preempt or p propair for that. there is no consensus for how to deal with bin laden or the infrastructure that harbored bin laden. everyone knows it's a real problem, but there's a sense we have no leverage and you can hear that in obama's interview. they're perplexed by how to go forward. >> mr. mayor, it struck me watching "60 minutes," the president addressed the nation last night, in the space of one
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week, the wine of the attack republicans chose to purr ssuep has become commander in chief. >> one of the greatest examples ever because he's publicized being decisive to the entire world. his goal is to keep that conversation going. at the same time, addressing real concerns about whether pakistan kind of harbored a climate where in bin laden could be thclose to the store it have power. i think everybody's shocked how close bin laden was to the capital of pakistan and they have some explaining to do. >> last night, essentially a coin toss as to whether he was there or not. he was talking on "60 minutes," discussing the risk. >> as outstanding a job as our intelligence teams did and i cannot praise them enough.
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they did an extraordinary job. just the slenderist bits of information. to piece this all together. at the end of the day, this was still a 55-45 situation. we could not say definitively that bin laden was there. had he not been there, there would have been significant consequences. >> president obama also had to weigh questions and reject advice from some of his closest national security advisers. >> every time i sit down in the situation room, every adviser knows i need their best assessments, so the fact that there were some who voiced doubts about this approach was invaluable because it meant the plan was sharper. it meant we had thought our
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options. when i made the decision, i was making it based upon the very best information. it wasn't as if any of the folks were voicing doubts wasn't something i wasn't running through my own head. >> he said all his aides didn't know about the plan. he shared how tight lipped he had to be among his own people. >> one of the great successes of this operation were that weshl able to keep this thing secret. it's a testimony to how seriously everybody took this operation and the understanding that any leak could not only compromising the mission, but killing some of the guys we were sending in there, and so very few people in the white house knew. the vast majority of my most senior aides did not know. >> among those who were in the know were members of the president's national security team. he shared last night the stress he felt as the entire group
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watched the operation unfold. >> i want to go to the situation room. what's the mood? >> tense. >> people talking? >> yeah, but doing a lot of listening as well because we were able to monitor the situation in realtime and it was the longest 40 minutes of my life with the possible exception of when sasha gomeningitis when she was three months old and i was waiting for doctor to tell me she was all right. >> we are joined by jim miklaszewski. you know the history well of the pursuit of osama bin laden. there have been many cases where they had perhaps a 50-50 shot and did not go in, whether under clinton or bush. take us inside that situation room, to the decision the president had to make
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despite the 55-45 proposition he mentioned. >> the remarkable thing about this, with intense intelligence eyes on that compound for about nine or ten months, intelligence officials still were not certain that osama bin laden himself was in there. that's how much he protected his privatesy and the compound was constructed in a way, very cleverly, that you could not see many areas of it no matter from what angle you surveilled it and overhead satellites were useless because they were shooting straight down. as the president said, it was a 55-45% likelihood that osama bin laden was there, but the evidence was compelling enough. it wasn't just eyes on and if listening. it was the following the curers
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for nine or ten months that there's somebody really important in there and that was osama bin laden. >> how much do we know about the alleged safe house? do we know what types of people? afghans or pakistanis involved? what do we know about this? >> apparently, there were pakistanis involved because to put americans in there would have blown that cover almost immediately. we're told the safe house, it it wasn't next door. about three to five clom kilometers away. they didn't want to alert anybody inside and again, this compound was situated at the end of a dead end road, so unless you had business at the end of that dead end, it was difficult for them to even walk by the facility. there were some things we've been told that off the record, because they are classified, about the way they got ears and
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eyes on partially inside that compound, but it was a tough nut to crack. osama bin laden and his like around him were pretty clever in concealing his presence. >> part of the operation, the decision the president made, too, was to go in with people and not bomb from the air. that was part of the decision that president clinton had to make in the late '90s. so, the president decided to go in small and precise. >> in iraq, when our forces went to get saddam hussein, u.s. forces were occupying the country. we had total control of air space. for the president to go deep into a country that doesn't want us there, don't have sovereignty, don't have control of the air space, going deep, the kind of operation that is a tough call and that you can only do once. >> is there a sense within the pentagon, that this is it?
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our government could not get way with an operation like this again given pakistani's reaction to it. >> i wouldn't rule it out, however, osama bin laden was a once in a lifetime shot here. they did roll the dice. all chips were in. however you wanted to describe it, they had to do what they did and certainly not inform the pakistani government that they were going to do it because in previous operations when they were going after mid to lower level targets, they would share that information with the pakistanis only to find by the time the predator drone got there to fire its missile, those targets were long gone. there were serious suspicions. and in terms of the u.s.-pakistani relationship, it will be tested early this week because the pakistani military intelligence gathered up, seven women, 15 chilen, three of osama bin laden's wives, they've
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been interrogated those women and the u.s. has politely asked if they could get some of that information or even take part in this interrogations and so far, the pakistanis have not allowed that to happen. >> it was interesting to watch tom donnelly yesterday pretty much lean all over pakistan saying, we're going to find out what you people knew. >> he hasn't done a lot of media before today. he came out, great performance. sending a message to congress and mostly to pakistan that the u.s. isn't going to let this drop. they're the ones who support the talib taliban. if it weren't for pakistan, the war in afghanistan would probably not be necessary the way it is now, so this has been a bad relationship before. and again, i thought suggested he was pretty direct yesterday.
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>> mayor fenty, were you surprised that the president didn't get a larger bump in the polls? don't want to make this about poll numbers, but people, oh, my gosh, he's the guy that got osama bin laden. he got a spike, but a modest one. will probably come back to earth in the fight over the deficit. >> i would have wanted him to and i'm sure his insiders would have wanted to, also, but more and more, elections are coming down to how people's emotions are and what they feel. one of the greater concerns, he wouldn't have seemed strong enough going into the re-election. the more it's publicized in the media, the more people hear about this amazing decision with shaky odds to go in and get it down, he seems very much like, as much as a commander in chief as we've seen in our lifetime and i think those concerns,
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emotions will be high, even with the polls being bumped as much you would expect. >> it's interesting. these national security events tend to have a short shelf life. you look at carter in '78. camp david. big moment in carter's foreign policy. and it helped him in the midterms in '78 only to get decimated two years later by reagan. if the world is a mess, leading up to the reagan election, reagan vickry, i don't think people are saying, well, he had this great moment a year and a half ago, if the military is in flames, i think this event is important, but not defining. >> it's hard for people to get what could have gone wrong. because everything went right. he's got to keep explaining how bad it could have been. >> mark halperin, the beltway idea that's been out in, the president negotiates with a
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position of strength, republicans will respect him now. would you like to deal with that idea? >> ha. no indication of that. there are two columnists who normally don't write well about the president. that's about the only thing i've seen that suggests he's going to have anything like a stronger hand in dealing with this domestic agenda. >> the supposed treasure-trove of intelligence that the s.e.a.l.s picked up, have you encountered anybody in the pentagon going, wow, you won't believe this, you won't believe that? >> the officials are absolutely giddy about what they found. first of all, it contains names, addresses, phone number, contacts. they're looking for bank accounts in particular.
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just like this political scandals follow the money. they also believe -- here's a sort of side effect to all of this. even if they don't have the name, those operators out there have to believe the u.s. has their names and quite frankly, the attorney general, eric holder, before congress, just two days after, said they did find names that they had now put on the worst list around the world to keep an eye on. so those operators have to be leery. o can i trust, and the s.e.a.l.s closing in on me. one official suggested it was the courier that led the u.s. and navy to osama bin laden, he suggested we should be looking for a trail of dead couriers. >> you expect the treasure-trove of intelligence will clear up
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the -- there have been conflicting reports he likes pepsi. some say he liked coke. any indication? >>. >> still conflicting reports because one market operator said they were buying pepsi. another said they were buying coke. it's the blindfold taste test. >> i got him for a pepsi man. jim miklaszewski, great reporting. coming up, the man who men's health has declared america's fittest congressman. wait until you see this pictures. aaron shock of illinois will be here, next. also, walter moseley talks about his book. first, here's bill karins with a check on the forecast. >> good morning, everyone. what a week this is going to be. this is the week a lot of us have waited for. gorgeous spring weather. d.c. to southern new england and mid-atlantic is going to be nice. enjoy it. warm afternoons, cool nights,
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can't ask for better than that. around the country, we have record issues. record heat in texas and oklahoma with a horrible drought. on the mississippi river, historical flooding and horrible thunderstorms rolled through minneapolis this morning. for chicago, as great as it's going to be in the east, all the bad weather's going to be in the middle of the country. you're watching "morning joe," beautiful shot there this morning, brewed by starbucks. hey, did you ever finish last month's invoices? sadly, no. oh. but i did pick up your dry cleaning and had your shoes shined. well, i made you a reservation at the sushi place around the corner. well, in that case, i better get back to these invoices... which i'll do right after making your favorite pancakes. you know what? i'm going to tidy up your side of the office. i can't hear you
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over the last two years, no one has been more critical of president obama's conduct of the war on terror than you have. at one point, you said he was raising the risk of another attack. how much credit do you give him for taking out bin laden and does it change your mind about the way he's been fighting this war? >> i think you've got to give him a lot of credit for conducting the raid that got bid laden. i think he handled it well. gets my marks for making that decision. >> joining us now, the best-selling author of 12 steps for political revelation, the great walter moseley. good to see you. last time we were together, we were running around phoenix with a merry band of thieves, you and
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i. >> that was a lot of fun. big room full of people that i don't think would be in front of me anywhere else. >> we did a book event together. i had american freak show. he had this book. let's talk about the new book. "12 steps toward political revelation." >> i think most people in america have gotten addicted to various things. not the least of which is who's running them. how their lives are being run. this country is the place that's supposed to help me. these corporations are the people who are going to save me. to some degree, those thins are true. we have to change them in ourself to have impact to make the country a better place. things about education, how we should be working politically. and you know, one of the things that i'm really clear about is that the people to most in america are experts because our
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experts are being paid by people who don't have our best interest in mind. >> it's such a smart point. if you go back over the last decade, whether it's 9/11, iraq, katrina, the financial crisis, any idea that you have that someone would come in to save you, that the government would you say going to be there and make it all right has been blown up. >> we kind of hope for it. we hope that one day, because that person is smarter, more knowledgeable and the thing is, we have to strengthen ourself and our connection. >> what do you mean when you say we have to do a better job at understanding what class we're in. >> most people in america say, i'm in the middle class. but in my understanding, the middle class, if you lose your job, your life doesn't change at all for a year. you go to the same clubs, your
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donate to the same places. if you're working class, your whole life changes. all of a sudden, you're eating at mcdonald's. your kid's going to the city college. your retirement is going out the window. once you understand wa class you're in, you know -- >> is it one of the dangers of a class system and we have a class system in this country. is that you know, we live in a culture where too many people, myself included. sometimes confuse wealth. there are a lot of things we're confused about. i think we know better. we don't have the time to sit and think about it and don't
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have the intelligence. in one of my 12 steps, just once in a week, express their ideas. just talk. just the idea of expressing and thinking can help make a different world. >> do you think president obama's done his best to try to make it that period for the working class is a little bit longer. i think one of the hallmarks of his administration, try to help people who have been laid off. >> i think obama has been trying, but the thing is is still the working class instead of the middle class. if you think you're in the middle class, you think, my eggs are in that basket, when they're over in the other basket. i'm not, you know, some people who are leaders who aren't happy with, but regardless, they are a all on another place. the every day people have to learn, that we can't live in the
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past and to live in the present. our democratic system is kind of like late 19th century. we're living in the internet system where we can have this kind of virtual parliament going on and nobody's talking about it. >> this is an era where you could do facebook. my friend was suggesting -- he's been a huge giver to president obama, that if you did facebook and he did a dry run of it, it turns out the american people most care about legalizing marijuana. but we could also have like a facebook and which we could actually make a difference. we could talk, you still need congress people. you still need a president, a supreme court. but there are a lot of decisions we could just be making as we go along. we used to have -- went by
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force, character, steam engine train, we're moving at the speed of light, but acting like it's 1895. one level is the thing we need to get together and work, but also, i want to get people thinking about things cht one of problems have experts, i'm right, this is what you have to do. this is a book saying we need to think about this. what do you think of good education? what do you think the cost of living is? this is the question i've been asking every economist. if i could understand what america is worth, i could understand what each american is worse and if i could tell the dying appalachain that he's worth $3 million, and my wife is, too, what's wrong? >> where do we begin with changing? overhauling a system that's been in place for over 250 years. where do you start?
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>> the first thing is that just the idea of bringing up the questions, what is the problem. that's the first step. what do we think the problem is. i say what i think the problem is. others have different ideas. at the end of that, i think we have to start to wonder how we get together. like in small groups and discuss things. wa one of the really important things, on an airplane with a guy. i was going first class and the guy worked for one of the big retailer places. it won't name them, but his major level of study was the buying practices of left-handed people versus right-handed people because left-handed people buy differently when you walk down an aisle. he was trying to figure out how to make the most out of those sales. they, the corporations, are thinking 24 hours a day about how to control how we buy,
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think, move we have to spend at least 90 minutes a day thinking about who we are politically. >> so, how much of a problem do you think we are with collectively and media in that we should be discussing these problems when talking about charlie sheen and donald trump. >> i think the biggest problem with the media is that it's owned by those corporations that have their interests somewhere other than every day people. i'm shocked to be on a show like this, because when i talk about -- >> it will be heavily edited. >> when i'm talking about the media, i think the big problem, charlie sheen stuff, that's interesting. this is britain's circus. but on the other hand, there's a more sinister goal because the people who own the corporations own everything else and there's certain things that people don't want to say. it's not profitable.
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if you say something really unpopular, it's unprofitable and that's not good. we have to make a profit or we can't stay in business. sxwl did you tell the guy on the plane to just have the customer turn around and come down the aisle the other way? >> i'm sure he thought of that. you have to figure out how to turn those guys around. he might have said that. >> thanks so much for being here. "12 steps toward political revelation." fascinating ideas. thanks. when we come back, business before the bell with mark haines. too much on your plate?
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i just got caught up watching the pirates of the caribbean marathon. ♪
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♪ ♪ >> you had to watch the whole thing. not the edited version. high concept. mark haines is here. he looks more confused than any of us, down at the new york stock exchange. let's not even go there.
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>> andy samburg does the video. digital short. >> it's always a great day when it starts on a morning, willie. >> you find a way to do it every day. >> i try. >> what are you looking at there, mark? >> not a whole lot. it's very quiet. although i'm sure cramer's excited about the latest goldman news. we had this big sell off last week in commodities. i think overall, 12% decline. now, a month ago, goldman sachs, cramer's old firm, did say they were underweight. they recommended you be underweight commodities. this morning, they are saying looks like a buying opportunity. and so, we are seeing a turn around of the commodities at least the ones i can see from here. gold is up nine bucks back to 1500. oil is up 2.5.
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not quite back to 100. that will probably be the story. we'll see whether goldman's predictions are true. on the business front, we have hertz bidding a rival bid because avis bid first, bidding for dollar thrifty. dollar tlit thrifty is a combination of dollar and thrifty. now, they want to be dollar thrifty, i guess. things are looking up. commodities are looking up, stocks are looking up and we'll keep your fingers crossed. >> why is it, mark, that we do not here talk about raising the march requirements for oil far more important than silver and yet it's just mum? there's no sense that maybe you should have to put up more capital if you're a hedge fund and you're just trying to control the flow of oil. >> a great point and great talking point, jim. they just savaged the silver market by changing the margin
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requirements. i guess maybe it's so big and so important they are afraid to tinker with it? but that would certainly in silver, chase out a lot of speculation and would leave mainly the players, the people who for business reasons, have to hedge bets on oil. >> big oil companies. i've had a series of oil on the show and what they've been say is that if you raise the margin requirements of oil, will go down 10, 15 bucks. that would be very meaningful for the summer driving. >> that would be great. >> right thing to do. >> i remember you commenting willie, about the silver market being savaged. >> who told you? >> jim, how about raising the margin on -- >> i think it would be terrific. i think the silence from these exchanges is terrible and the only reason i think they changed
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silver is that they were going to skip on trade. if the president wanted to do something, he should say, hey, guys, wouldn't it be good to raise the margins because you could control a huge amount of oil versus the chevrons of the world. >> for those that don't know, margin is the amount of money you have to put up front. on some contracts, it's as little as 10%. so that's what we're talking about. raising the required amount of money to get into a contract. >> all right. mark haines, jim cramer, good stuff. coming up next, the man who men's health calls america's fittest congressman, aaron shock of illinois, next.
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welcome back. joining us now, aaron shock. not only is he the youngest member of congress, but now, men's health names him america's fittest congressman. look at that cover. you don't have rippling abs like that. >> they left the appendix scar out. >> how did they go about this? >> ever since the whole tmz shot that -- >> heard round the world. >> they put out after i got elected, i get ribbed every once in a while for my physical fitness. it's been a project of mine in the making. the debate in washington, d.c.
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has been about health care, who's paying for it. the federal government, private systems. what the studies show, two-thirds of americans are overweight or obese. people who are overweight spend twice as much as health care every year than people who are in shape and the problem with health care isn't so much who's paying for it, but it's controlling costs and the best way to control costs in this country is to get people in shape. getting them into an exercise program and so this is something, this is a crisis, quite frankly, in america, that we can own as americans, that we can control and get in the game and it doesn't take an act of congress. we think if we just pass this law or implement this program we can change things, but when it comes to health care, it is about individual responsibility. >> this is a great partnership you're doing with "men's health," fit for summer. it strikes me it's not the readers of "men's health" who are the problem. how do you reach out to the
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country and get to the core of this obesity question and show people how dire it is. >> one of the reasons i'm on "morning joe" this morning. we did the "today" show. we're partnering with nbc as well as "men's health" and women's health. we're going to be using all forms of maedia to get the message out and recognize you don't have to have an expensive gym membership. the ree tune i do every morning is a couple of cds. maybe it's just going for a jog. changing your diet doesn't cost a lot of money. maybe it's 20 or 30 minutes today and you'll get into an hour as it catches hold. >> we should point out, some people with completely hopeless. mike barnacicle.
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>> you have access to the house gym. you're a bus driver. you drive the cross town bus. you work at a desk all day for john hancock insurance. you're tired when you life work. what's the workout for people like us? >> you know what? it really depends on what their weight is currently. what they're comfortable with. when i started working out, it was in college and i went to a gym and asked for help. it wasn't rocket science. i didn't have a lot of money. i've got a very busy schedule. i spend half my week in d.c., half in illinois. i decided this was going to be my priority, so i have to get up at 5:30 in the morning. anything in life worth achieving is a bit of a sacrifice. i think when people understand the crisis in america, when you think about the fact that 25% of young people who voluntarily
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want to get into our military are rejected because of their physical fitness, ns a crisis. national security. and so, i'm a bit frustrated in d.c. that so much of the talk is about public option, private option, when we ought to be focused on getting individuals to live responsibly. that's how you're going to slow the curve of health care costs. >> there's a multibillion dollar industry when we're children, to eat sugar, candy. watch the nba yesterday and it's larry byrd spilling the lunch from guys that if think eat that stuff, they cannot play. >> you know what, jim, you hit the nail on the head. trust me, nobody gets cookies and coffee shoved in their face more than i do. all the banquet food i got to digest is tough, but it's all about making responsible choices
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and every american has the ability to do it. >> let me ask you about the photographers. it's a great initiative. you're a smart guy. spent a lot of time around you. a rising star in congress. do you worry that with the tmz picture, people start to look at you and see first, that's the hunky guy, the guy who takes his shirt off for magazines rather than what you do on capitol hill? >> to get people to pay attention, you have to get their attention, first. you've got to get them to wake up. people have tried to get america in shape for years and this is a little out of the box, but i think at the end of the day, if we can get a few thousand americans to sign up and change their habits, it can be millions of dollars saved. 8 out of $10 we spent in america on health care are on preventable diseases. that's not something you're born with. 8 out of $10 of health care is
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spent on something you could control with diet and exercise and we're trying to get more people to do the right thing. >> take your shirt off for the good of the country. i like it. >> join our program and you just might. >> fit for summer in conjunction with "men's health." up next, the best of late night. [ woman ] welcome back jogging stroller. you've been stuck in the garage while i've been sneezing from the dust in here, and the pollen outside. but with 24-hour zyrtec®, i get prescription strength relief from my allergy symptoms. it's the brand allergists recommend most. ♪ lilly and i are back on the road again, where we belong. with zyrtec® i can love the air®. [ male announcer ] get up to $6 in savings on zyrtec® products at zyrtectv.com.
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i leave the decision to my executors provided that where ever it is, they do not bury me at sea. as my family well knows, i have a deathly fear of being eaten by fish, so i'm very serious about this. do not bury me at sea. third, as executors to this my last will and testament, i name my dear friends at the pakistani intelligence services. they are solid, reliable people and may i add, among the few individuals a person can still trust in this corrupt, cynical world we live in. >> so great to be back on fox news. a network that both pays me and shows me the questions ahead of
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time. i just hope that tonight the lame stream media won't twist my words by repeating them. i'm planning a trip to the middle east where i will be filming a cameo in hangover 3, the third, the fellows go to a bar and i'm there. i also recently purchased rosetta stone, english. this week, we vanquished one of the world's great villains and i am glad to say good riddance to katie couric. here's your business travel forecast on this monday. gorgeous weather in store for the mid-atlantic and much of new england. all the trouble weather's going to be in the northern plains.
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we'll watch chicago, the chance of storms. boston, a chance of a few sprinkles and showers. watch out in minneapolis, a chance of storms for you. have a great day. waiting for you. like at the hotels.com 48 hour sale. this tuesday and wednesday only. hotels.com. be smart. book smart. [ technician ] are you busy? management just sent over these new technical manuals. they need you to translate them into portuguese. by tomorrow. [ male announcer ] ducati knows it's better for xerox to manage their global publications. so they can focus on building amazing bikes. with xerox, you're ready for real business.
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i'm loving weight watchers new pointsplus program and the edge it's giving me. ♪ and i'm feeling good
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go on, join for free. weight watchers new pointsplus. because it works. i learned from aaron shock, 90 minutes a day by the middle of summer, you could look like this. think you and i could get this kind of results? >> i don't know about that, willie, but if he's doing 90 minutes a day in the house of representatives, i would urge all the other members of congress to do about six hours a day and stay out of our way. >> lock them up in the gym. like the way you're thinking, mike. >> i learned there was a potential hostage situation that's going to occur tomorrow night in new jersey. willie's book, tomorrow night, books and greetings in new jersey. latest tone.
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>> with my co-author. t a great friend of mine. get rich quick. all the self-help books. you'll learn tomorrow. a big blowout. also, mika will be signing copies of her book. everyone has a book out. on wednesday, she'll be at sixth and i in washington. more information on our website. anything left? >> well, finish reading the book. >> stick around. we'll have you back tomorrow. also want to thank my friends at stockton college in southern new jersey. had a great time with you all. see you tomorrow.

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